01

CAN I ADOPT ONE OF YOUR DOGS?

Yes! All the dogs you see on the adoption page are available for adoption.

We work hard to ensure that all our dogs live in a home environment for as long as they need to, so they are well balanced, happy and healthy dogs before forever homes are sought.

Please note that due to the BREXIT situation, we currently cannot re-home dogs to the UK. :(


If you are from Belgium, Netherlands, Switzerland or Austria please let us know if you are interested in adopting one of our dogs. :)

Or fill out the adoption form and we will get back to you as soon as possible!

02

Do you deal with the adoption process yourself?

We do not deal with the adoption process ourselves, we work with rehoming partners in the UK (South) and Germany,

Our rehoming partner for Germany are:

- Ein Zuhause für Hunde e.V.
- Hundescheune Fläming e.V.

Our rehoming partner for the UK are:

- The Kit Wilson Trust for Animal Welfare

CONTACT US

03

Why do I need to fill in an Adoption Questionnaire?

Filling out an initial adoption questionnaire allows us to have a better understanding of your circumstances and living environment to ensure that our rescue dog finds the home they are most suited to and that the adopter has the most suitable dog for the home they can offer.

The questionnaire, once received is passed on to our relevant rehoming partner and they will then contact you to proceed, at this stage we are no longer involved except to receive updates as to the progress of our rescue in their new home.

This is done directly with our rehoming partners, however if you have successfully managed to adopt one of our rescues and want to contact us directly with news and updates then we would welcome the contact, as the futures of our rescues is very important to us.Filling out an initial adoption questionnaire allows us to have a better understanding of your circumstances and living environment to ensure that our rescue dog finds the home they are most suited to and that the adopter has the most suitable dog for the home they can offer.

The questionnaire, once received is passed on to our relevant rehoming partner and they will then contact you to proceed, at this stage we are no longer involved except to receive updates as to the progress of our rescue in their new home.

This is done directly with our rehoming partners, however if you have successfully managed to adopt one of our rescues and want to contact us directly with news and updates then we would welcome the contact, as the futures of our rescues is very important to us.

CONTACT US

04

Why do I need to fill in an Adoption Questionnaire?

Yes. Our dog adoption fee is 400 Euros for EU countries and 470 Pounds for the UK.

Also here to shed some “light” and to explain to you why there is an adoption fee, first some important preliminary information:

- A “dog adoption agreement” is not a purchase contract. We do not sell dogs; you can adopt dogs from us.

The “adoption fee” is not a purchase price” – it fulfils rather different purposes: Coverage of accrued costs and also creates a “barrier” not to get a dog thoughtlessly.

Now there will be the one or other person who will ask, “Shouldn't you be happy, that I am giving a poor dog in need a loving new home? Why must I pay for it?”.

Gladly we explain at this point why there is an adoption fee.

Quite on the contrary, we all invest not only a lot of time, energy, labor and love in our work and in the dogs in need – often we also pay our expenses or other costs privately. This begins with telephone and fuel costs, enough food and equipment for the care of our dogs.

The following are the basic costs for (most of) our dogs:

- General check-ups by the vet
- Vaccinations (at least two, usually three basic immunisations)
- Worm treatments (always several)
- Flea / tick repellent (multiple doses)
- EU-pet passportMicrochip including implantation
- Food
- Traces (a database system introduced by the EU, which records all animal traffic, within the EU as well as entering or leaving from the EU)
- Castrations
- Transport costs

The adoption fee allows us to help more dogs that are in need.

05

Adopting a dog from abroad - Some questions to ask yourself!

A garden is great for the new dog, but is it escape-proof?

 

Some dogs are real escape artists and occasionally it shows in their name when they are called Houdini. ;)

 

A dog costs time and money! It is important to understand that pet ownership is a big financial responsibilty. 

 

Dogs loose hair, bring in dirt or chew up furniture ? Ask yourself "Can I handle it?".

 

Maybe I need educational help from a  dog trainer. Can I afford that?

 

These are the generally important points that should be clarified before buying/adopting a dog.

 

 

06

Adopting a dog from abroad - Saving a life! 

Now adopting a dog from a foreign country is always a unique situation.

 

A dog from the streets usually knows nothing or only little about the world.

 

Has often been treated badly and might even suffer from trauma.

 

A dog that has lived on the streets can be afraid in many situations because they overwhelm him or remind him of negative experiences.

 

We at Little Angels Rescue BG try to teach our rescued dogs a lot here:

 

- House training, because the pack lives in the house and not in kennels.

With the little ones and the stress of the trip, this can be "forgotten" for a short time, but as soon as they find their way in the new environment, the cleanliness also comes back.

 

- Leash and collar / harness training 

All our dogs are trained with a collar and leash, if possible with a harness, because the harness does not remind them of previous life on a chain. This is also important for the transport to the new home.

 

- With a lot of love and patience, even the heavily traumatised ones among our protégés learn to trust again. It takes a different amount of time. Some dogs need 1-2 years, some never. The dogs that have suffered from severe trauma will always have a place at LAR.

 

- Vet checks! Each of our dogs goes through several vet check ups and receives all required vaccinations, EU passport, chip and is neutered if possible. Flea treatments, deworming and grooming are always provided by LAR.

 

 

- Also the best food - barf - helps the rescued dogs to recover quickly.

 

Through this intensive contact we can describe each of the dogs fair and honestly, although transport and new surroundings throw some of them back sometimes. However, we would like to note that this is common for any dog that is adopted from a shelter or from abroad.

This is a term we call "two week shut down".

 

The dogs need lots of love, time and patience to arrive and build up trust.

 

Most of the animals know little or no city, car traffic, train or bus.

 

All this is new to them and they have to adjust step by step.

 

Some, on the other hand, do not show any stress whatsoever, but you should be prepared for anything.

 

Take enough free time  when your dog arrives and take things easy.

After all, this first time with the new family member is important for the life to come with your new family member.

07

Adopting a dog from abroad - The arrival

The first two weeks - Give the dog a break!

 

One of the biggest errors people make with new dogs and foster dogs it is rushing the dog into the new world so fast.

 

It is not uncommon for people to introduce the new pup to the whole extended family on the day of arrival!

 

And then are surprised that the dog is shy, scared and might have even snapped.

 

When bringing in a new dog, post finding, adoption, buying, etc, Please give the dog time to adjust to you and your family and the dogs in the new environment.

 

Just as if it were a new baby or puppy, we wouldn’t think of rushing out with a baby or puppy, yet with older pups and dogs we just expect them to take our lives in all at once!

 

For the first two weeks, (sometimes even longer) a dog takes in the new environment, who is their main confidant, or animal, who ARE these people!?

 

By pushing a dog too fast, and throwing too much at the dog we look like we are not the their friend, and the dog can feel it MUST defend itself.

 

We coo, coddle, drag the dog to home to home to person to person, and the dog has NO idea who we are. We correct for things it doesn’t understand, we talk in a new human language using words he does not know.

 

A key thing to remember is "this is the dating period NOT the honeymoon" When you first met your "spouse or significant other”, you were on your best behaviour, you were not relaxed enough to be all of yourself, were you?

 

Just think of the things you do physically once you get to KNOW a person, you wouldn’t run up to a stranger and hug them and squeeze them!?

 

Imagine, if on the first date, this new person, was all over you touching you and having their friends hug you and pat you on the head, and jostle your shoulders, looked in your mouth then he whisked you off to another strangers home and they did the same thing.

 

Would you think this person normal and SAFE?

 

Wouldn’t you feel invaded and begin to get a bit snarky or defensive yourself?

 

Wouldn’t you think to push these people away for obviously your date is out of their mind, as they aren’t going to save you from these weirdoes!!

 

Yet we do this very thing to our dogs, and then get upset or worried that they aren’t relaxed and accepting of EVERYTHING instantly!

 

By shutting down the dog, it gives the dog TIME to see you , meet YOU, hear and take in the new sounds and smells of your home and all the people in it.

 

In the 1st two weeks; . Make sure the dog has a safe spot in a room by itself if possible.

(dogs are sensory animals, they know more than you think without seeing it).

 

Leash the dog (so I don’t have to correct it ..you don’t have that right yet!), give it exercise time in the yard on lunge line or in fenced yard..but other than that.. LEASH. Do NOT let your new furry friend off leash. Unfortunately, too many people never listen and just let the dog off leash and we get the news that the dog has been run over or ran away. It is so IMPORTANT to keep the dog on a leash and a harness. 

 

Do no training at all, just fun exercise and maybe throw some toys for fun, leash the dog if you don’t have a fence outside. But DO NOT leave the yard, AT ALL.

 

No other dogs, no pet stores, nothing but you and household family, your home, your yard. (Unless of course the dog needs to go to the vetinarian). Walks in the first two weeks should be short and not long walks. Walks can be very stressful for there is so much coming at you and your dog! And the dog has no clue who you are yet. The dog may react to something and we start correcting it with the leash and we just installed a VERY STRESSFUL moment to the dog in what should be a fun and learning walk.

 

The dog needs to feel at ease with you and that YOU are the one to look to, that you are now here for the dog! He can trust in you and look to you for guidance.

 

Then you can venture out into new situations one at a time, the dog knows he can trust in his new humans and can relax under the fair guidance of his new best friend!

 

Exercise is important! Running and free time are stress relievers, but don’t set your dog up for failure, make exercise and yard time fun and relaxing and tiring!

 

Then PUT THE DOG AWAY. let it absorb and think and relax. Ignore crying or barking, just like a new born baby, he must find security when you are not right there, and if you run to him each time he will think barking and crying will get your attention.

 

Literally in two weeks you will see a change in the dog and begin to see its honest and true personality. Just like a house guest.. they are well behaved and literally shut down and “polite” themselves these first few weeks, then post this time, they relax and the true personality begins to shine thru.

 

So, please, if nothing else for your new dog, give it the time to LEARN YOU as you are learning who they are!